Golden Novelty Company Cast Front Clock, 1885 Patent, Cherub and Flowers

May 24, 2013 | By | 2 Replies More

Here is an early example of a Westclox clock, made while the company name was “The Western Clock Mfg. Co.” This clock was made around 1890.

The movement and its canister were made by “The Western Clock Mfg. Co.”, and the Golden Novelty Mfg. Co. made the cast case front and marketed the clock.

IMG_4936 Name on case IMG_4983

The movement is one-day with lever escapement. The Western Clock Mfg. Co. had a patented process where parts of the movement are cast from a lead alloy that holds the steel and brass acting parts together. In this early movement, the following parts are made of the lead alloy:

  • Pillars,
  • gear arbor bodies,
  • hour wheel pipe,
  • balance rim and hub,
  • body of pallet fork,

The pallets are hardened steel of 4-sided cross section, and the escape wheel has club teeth.

See more photos.

The case is cast iron, well polished and copper plated. The dial is paper, with a flat glass over it. The brass back of the movement canister has the September 22, 1885 patent date. Charles Stahlberg’s patent of Sept. 22, 1885 describes the basic process used to make United Clock Co., Western Clock Mfg. Co., Western Clock Co. and Westclox clocks. To make a wheel and pinion assembly, steel pinion and pivot wires and the brass wheel were held together in a jig while a molten lead alloy was poured in. Then the lead alloy solidified, holding the steel and brass parts firmly in place.

Repair job 6065. 6 bushings, polished 2 pivots.


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Category: Westclox History

Last updated: May 25, 2013

Comments (2)

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  1. Bill Stoddard says:

    Getting it overhauled will probably cost more than the clock’s value, so you might as well try winding it and see if it works.

  2. Callie Witmer says:

    Hi,
    I have the cherub flower clock from Regent MFG Co showing Sept 22, 85

    Mine is all there but the face plate is not set and I do not know if it will wind up. I’ve been afraid to try to move it. I’ve had it since 1977. It’s never been cleaned so it’s a dark patina on it.

    Can you tell me an estimated value and should I take it to be cleaned and repaired or will it not increase the value. It’s something I would like to give to my grandchild one day.

    Thank you,
    Callie

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