Sessions Black Mantel Clock, Early

December 5, 2013 | By | 2 Replies More

I recently repaired this early Sessions “Black” mantel clock. The E. N. Welch Mfg. Co. became the Sessions Clock Co. in 1903, and the label on the back of this clock has BOTH company names on it. The case is 11 inches tall, 16 3/8 inches wide at the feet and 13 1/2 inches wide at the top. The case is enameled (painted) wood. The dial’s minute track is 4 1/4 inches diameter, and the minute hand is 2 1/8 inches long. The half-columns are painted wood, and the case trim is marbleized wood.

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Repair job 6245. A previous repair shop installed bushings, and some were too tight, making the clock not work. I polished the pivots and installed 17 bushings and replaced the pins in one pinion. The original mainsprings were stronger than necessary (0.018 inch thick) and caused main wheel tooth wear. I installed thinner mainsprings (R & M no. 77.303) to reduce future wear. The mainspring dimensions are:

  • Time Mainspring – 3.4 by 0.0162 by 120 inches;
  • Strike Mainspring – 3.4 by 0.0163 by 120 inches.

The “early” features of the movement include:

  • The movement must be taken apart to remove the regulator shaft;
  • The two mainwheels have clicks that are large like Gilbert Clock Co. made instead of the smaller normal clicks that Sessions made.

The pendulum bob weighs 3.4 ounces.


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Category: American Clock Mainsprings, American Clock Repair

Last updated: December 22, 2013

Comments (2)

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  1. David Bencze says:

    i have thr sister odel Nicolini C, same size, etc. I also needed the glass ordered it from Ronell Clock Co. got it in 5 days (USA). Flat Glass 5 3/8″ Part GLF-679 $2.95, Convex Glass 5 3/8″ PartGLC-564 $3.80

  2. Thomas Kohler says:

    Hi Bill,
    I own the exact same clock model which I found in a box about 20 years ago – in pieces. Story goes that a maid dropped the clock while cleaning and it must have been in the attic for a long time. A clock maker repaired her “insides” while I restored the woodwork. Unfortunately the glass was missing! Do you have any idea where I can look for a replacement? Kind Regards, Thomas, South Africa

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