Ingraham Black Mantel Clock Made In 1906

September 5, 2014 | By | 2 Replies More

I repaired this 1906 Ingraham mantel clock. Clocks of this type were popular around 1900 to 1920. Collectors refer to them as “black mantel” clocks.

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Repair job 6256. Movement date code 3 06. I moved the escape wheel on its arbor to engage the unworn surface of the pallets. I trued the escape wheel’s teeth. I closed the verge (moved the pallet tips closer together) to make the drops correct. The original mainsprings were:

Time: 3/4 by 0.0182 inch

Strike: 3/4 by 0.018 inch

The springs were stronger than necessary, so I replaced them with new, thinner mainsprings, #15959 from Timesavers (the newer type with copper rivet in the loop). The dimensions are:

Time: 3/4 by 0.0158 by 120 inches

Strike: 3/4 by 0.0162 by 120 inches

I polished the pivots and installed 14 bushings.


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Category: Clock Repair

Last updated: September 3, 2014

Comments (2)

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  1. Bill Stoddard says:

    One factor is the amount of material that has been worn away from the mainwheel teeth. Sometimes, 10% to 40% of each tooth may be worn away (or flowed away) due to the stress.

    Quite often, original springs that are 0.018 inch thick are stronger than necessary. (Some very old springs, from the 1860s – 1870s may be that thick but not be as strong, due to the steel being treated differently than newer steel).

    It is often a judgement call, as torque measurements I made have not been consistent.

  2. How does one tell whether springs are stronger than necessary?

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