Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 Day Clock ca. 1902

May 9, 2015 | By | 4 Replies More

Here is a Jahresuhrenfabrik (JUF for short) 400 day clock made around 1902. It has a disc pendulum, small dial, and delicate spade hands. It has beautifully turned finials above the dial.

IMG_3064

Note: The hour hand needs alignment.

Back of the movement. The back says  PATENT ANGEMELDET ---------- PATENTS APPLIED This movement is identified as being Horolovar back plate number 1471.

Back of the movement. The back says
PATENT
ANGEMELDET
———-
PATENTS
APPLIED
This movement is identified as being Horolovar back plate number 1471.

I repaired this clock, and fixed some problems caused by previous repair work.

The picture below shows the mainspring after removal from the clock. Note that it is cone shaped. It should be flat.

The original mainspring is "coned" instead of being flat. This can happen when someone inserts it into the barrel by hand instead of using a mainspring winder. This is a very severs case of coning - the coned spring is 3 1/4 inches tall!

The original mainspring is “coned” instead of being flat. This can happen when someone inserts it into the barrel by hand instead of using a mainspring winder. This is a very severe case of coning – the coned spring is 3 1/4 inches tall!

Here is the new mainspring that I installed:

New mainspring

New mainspring

The “arch” of the clock (the decorative part with the finials above the dial) was fastened to the clock with GLUE, as one screw hole didn’t have a shoulder for the screw to bear on. I inserted a bushing in that hole to repair it.

This clock has an unusual anchor (the part that goes back and forth as the clock ticks). Most JUF clocks have a solid-body anchor, but this one has adjustable pallets like most other makers use. Here is a photo:

Closeup of anchor with adjustable pallets

Closeup of anchor with adjustable pallets

See more photos.

Repair job 6585. I polished five pivots. The 0.004 inch thick suspension spring was good, and I adjusted it to hang straight in the upper block and adjusted the height of the fork. The hand set tension washer had a hole that was too big, causing it to bear on the front plate, causing friction that would stop the clock. I installed a new tension spring. I installed a Horolovar 19 x 36 mainspring.


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Category: 400 Day Clock Repair, Schatz 400 Day Clock History

Last updated: May 9, 2015

Comments (4)

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  1. Luke says:

    Oops I forgot to mention the style of rachet and click assembly which also means that it could be a Huber manufactured for Hauck since they did produce clocks for Hauck for a few years

  2. Luke says:

    Hi Bill listing some points without going into detail how I identified it’s not a JUF
    Style of Crown finals / suspension bracket and block / dial style / pillar finals / square pillar supports at bottom / base style / pendulum with screws/ size of pendulum / Parent stamp on the back plate

    Because it has adjustable palets I will say it’s a Hauck

    Hope someone else will share their views.

  3. Bill Stoddard says:

    Thanks, Luke – that explains why it has adjustable pallets. I hope there will be an update to the Horolovar Repair Guide that will contain all the newest research.

  4. Luke says:

    Bill this is not a JUF clock it’s either a Andreas Huber or Philip Hauck if you join the NAWCC forum you will be able to identify the clocks you come across easily.

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