RSSCategory: American Clock Repair

Replacing Mainsprings in American Antique Clocks

March 14, 2009 | By | 4 Replies More
Replacing Mainsprings in American Antique Clocks

Most spring driven American antique clocks are overpowered (they have springs that are stronger than necessary). Even at age 100 years (give or take) the mainsprings are almost always strong enough to operate the clock reliably, assuming that the clock has been repaired properly, including POLISHING THE PIVOTS and installing bushings. A spring should be […]

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Last updated November 26, 2009

Gilbert Tambour Mantel Clock, 1919

February 25, 2009 | By | 1 Reply More
Gilbert Tambour Mantel Clock, 1919

I just finished repairing this 1919 Gilbert Mantel clock (the movement has “19” stamped on the front plate, meaning 1919). This movement has nickel plated steel plates with brass bushings. The brass bushings can be reamed and bushings installed, just like a movement with normal brass plates. This movement needed all the train wheel pivots […]

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Last updated November 26, 2009

Ithaca Grandfather Clock with Gilbert Movement

February 12, 2009 | By | 13 Replies More
Ithaca Grandfather Clock with Gilbert Movement

I recently repaired an Ithaca grandfather clock. Ithaca is famous for its double dial perpetual calendar clocks, and they made grandfather clocks from ca. 1898 until 1917 (when Ithaca closed). This clock has an 8 day time and strike movement made by Gilbert Clock Co. in Winsted, Connecticut. It is spring driven, and is a […]

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Last updated November 26, 2009

Noah Pomeroy Semi-Deadbeat Escapement

February 9, 2009 | By | Reply More
Noah Pomeroy Semi-Deadbeat Escapement

Noah Pomeroy received patent number 92644 on July 13, 1869; titled “Improvement in deadbeat verge clocks”. The patent describes a way of making a cheap deadbeat verge from a strip of steel. The standard recoil American strip verge escapement has just one face on each pallet, doing both locking and impulse. Pomeroy’s verge has both […]

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Last updated November 26, 2009

Seth Thomas 8 Day Four Sided Top Shelf Clock

January 21, 2009 | By | 1 Reply More
Seth Thomas 8 Day Four Sided Top Shelf Clock

I recently overhauled this Seth Thomas shelf clock. This clock has an excellent movement design, as it runs very efficiently, allowing the use of thin mainsprings to reduce wear. Both the time and strike mainsprings in this clock are the original springs, and measure 11/16 inch wide and 0.015 inches thick. This is much thinner […]

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Last updated November 26, 2009

An Ugly Repair Job Corrected

November 24, 2007 | By | 8 Replies More
An Ugly Repair Job Corrected

This is a good looking Seth Thomas oak kitchen clock. Date stamp on the back reads 7981 which translates to the year 1897. Movement Before Repair Front of movement showing two crudely soldered on “Rathbun” bushings (on pivots T3F and T5F). This type of work is done by someone who does not like to take […]

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Last updated November 27, 2009

Ingraham Oak Shelf Clock

November 16, 2007 | By | 1 Reply More
Ingraham Oak Shelf Clock

I just repaired an Ingraham oak shelf clock, with a date of 6 14 (June 1914) on the movement. A previous repairer had installed a time mainspring that was way too strong (.018 inch thick), which had caused about 50% tooth wear on the time mainwheel. After the overhaul, I installed a Merritt’s P1496 mainspring […]

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Last updated November 27, 2009

Ingraham Tambour with Quick Release Dial

October 7, 2007 | By | 1 Reply More
Ingraham Tambour with Quick Release Dial

The dial on this Ingraham tambour can be removed very quickly. Instead of the 4 usual screws holding the dial pan to the case, it has 4 studs fastened in the case front, and 4 semi-circular openings in the side of the dial pan which snap over the studs. The back door of the case […]

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Last updated October 8, 2007

Russell & Jones Hanging Oak Parlor Clock

September 27, 2007 | By | 5 Replies More
Russell & Jones Hanging Oak Parlor Clock

I just overhauled a lovely Russell & Jones hanging oak parlor clock. Height: 28 inches. It has a beautiful glass tablet with an image of a lighthouse. (My repair job no. 4341.) The movement is 8 day time and strike, with plate size approx. 5-3/8 x 3-3/8 The original strike mainspring was 0.016 inch thick, […]

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Last updated November 27, 2009

American Clock Cleaning

August 23, 2007 | By | 1 Reply More
American Clock Cleaning

After a clock movement has been repaired, it should look like it has always been well taken care of, and not show obvious signs that it has been “repaired”. As part of this, the cleaning process should not be harsh. For typical American antique clocks, I use “Historic Timekeepers” cleaning fluid (available from Timesavers as […]

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Last updated November 27, 2009

Things to check when repairing an antique American clock movement

July 25, 2007 | By | Reply More
Things to check when repairing an antique American clock movement

Here are some things I check or do when repairing an antique American clock movement of the open spring type. Check wear on time and strike mainwheel teeth and record on log sheet. If mainspring arbor hooks have high backs, file down the backside to make it easier to unhook the inner end of the […]

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Last updated November 28, 2009

Bushing American Antique Clocks

June 28, 2007 | By | 1 Reply More
Bushing American Antique Clocks

I prefer American made KWM size bushings of 1.8 millimeter height for for the train wheel pivots of antique American mantel, wall and shelf clocks with open mainsprings (clocks made by makers such as Ansonia, Ingraham, New Haven, Seth Thomas, Waterbury, etc). Commonly needed bushing sizes are L-41 through L-45, and L-88. The bushing is […]

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Last updated November 28, 2009